Q&A: How Long To Urinate After Drinking Water? (Water & Health)

Do you ever wonder if you’re urinating the right number of times in a day?

Or if you’re going to the bathroom the correct amount of time after you drink water?

Does everyone urinate for the same amount of time and take the same time to process water into urine?

In this article, we’ll give you a quick rundown on everything you need to know about urination timing. If you’ve ever wondered whether you go too frequently or too soon after you drink water, we’ve got the answers you’re looking for below.

Remember, however, that not everyone’s body is exactly the same. Between two healthy adults, there are several factors that can contribute to the frequency with which you urinate and the urgency you feel after drinking water, too. Men and women also have differences when it comes to urination, so for the purposes of this article, we will be speaking very generally regarding this information.

Keep this in mind when you check out the facts we have listed below. We hope that, by the time you finish reading this article, you’ll be more informed and able to tell whether or not you need to speak to your healthcare provider about your urination.

Water and Urination Facts

No matter what might be going on with your body, you need to be well aware of what’s normal and what isn’t. If you’re a healthy adult, there’s a fairly standard normal range your urination should fall into. If it deviates significantly from this range, this could be a sign there’s something going on that needs to be checked out. In some instances, people just simply don’t pee as much or as quickly as others, or vice-versa, and this can be totally normal for you too. It all depends on your individual body. In this section, we’ll give you a quick rundown of information about how long to urinate after drinking water when you’re a healthy adult.

frequent urination after drinking little water

How much urine can my bladder hold?

  • A healthy adult bladder can hold 16 ounces of urine for anywhere between 2 and 5 hours. Two to five hours may seem like a pretty big range, but it all depends on your body and your physical makeup. Men can usually hold their urine longer than women, and pregnant women or those who are on their period may not be able to hold it as long as other women, in turn. Your age, weight, and level of physical activity can also make a difference.
  • Urine is more than just the water you drink. When we say you can hold 16 ounces of urine, this doesn’t mean 16 ounces of water you’ve had to drink, so keep this in mind! The more water you have, the more frequent and urgently you’ll need to pee—it’s just nature.

***NOTE: If you're trying to track how much water you're drinking every day, check out our curated list of drinking schedule water bottles and take control of your body's hydration.

How long does it take to pee after drinking water

  • If you drink 2 liters of water per day, which is the recommended volume, you should have to pee roughly every four hours. Again, this is not a solid rule, but it’s a good place to get started when you’re thinking about how often you go in a day. Most adults should need to pee around six to eight times a day at this rate, but keep in mind that this number will go up depending on how much water and other liquids you have throughout your day, too. On the other hand, if you aren’t getting enough water, you’re not going to pee as often because your body is dehydrated.

What can make me urinate more often?

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    Many factors can increase the volume of your urine. When you go to the bathroom, you’re probably pretty used to how long it takes you to finish peeing and how much urine you have at any given trip to the toilet. This can change depending on a few things, some of which are more concerning than others:
  • Diabetes. This condition can affect the volume of your urine as well as how frequently you go throughout the day. If you know you have diabetes and your urination patterns change, tell your doctor right away.
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    Medication. Some types of medication, both short-term and long-term, are diuretics, which means they’ll make you have to go to the bathroom more often than you would if you weren’t taking the medication. If this is a normal side effect of your medication, it’s not a big concern.
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    Caffeine and alcohol intake. More caffeine or alcohol equals more trips to the bathroom, plain and simple.
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    Pregnancy. Pregnancy makes women have to go to the bathroom much more frequently.

How long does it take to urinate, exactly?

  • It should take you about seven seconds to complete urination when you go to the toilet. Like everything else on this list, this is a generalization, but it’s a good ballpark range to consider. If you find that it takes you a lot longer, you may have a urinary tract infection. If you don’t pee very long at all when you felt like you had to go, you may have an overactive bladder.

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Regular urination is a sign of a properly functioning bladder and urinary tract system and there are a multitude of problems that can arise if this system stops functioning in your body. Of course, maintaining a healthy urinary tract is never a bad thing, and learning more about what you can do to improve your body's urinary tract will only help prevent future problems that may arise in the future. 

If you're looking to improve and fortify your own urinary tract health, there are plenty of premium solutions available to try. Check out some of these items below and take further control of your bladder and kidney health:

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ALWAYS REMEMBER: Our bodies are all unique to one another and even though a product is labeled as safe for consumption, it's always best to get a professional medical opinion before trying out any health regimen or treatment on your body.

Conclusion

We hope you’ve been able to learn a little something about the relationship between drinking water and urinating. We also hope that, if you had any questions about your own urination frequency or urgency, we’ve been able to clear some of that up for you and help you determine whether or not it’s time to talk to your doctor. Remember that not everyone experiences urination the same way, but that you should be in the realm of “normal” for a healthy adult. Otherwise, you may need some medication or a lifestyle change to help solve the issue.

But what happens if your experience is very extreme compared to what’s listed above? Is it a bad sign if you feel like you need to pee immediately after you drink water? What about if it takes a long time to reach that point?

urinate frequently after drinking water

If you feel like you need to pee right after you drink water, you may be drinking too much water. This may also be a sign of some damage or “crossed wires” with the nerves in your bladder, which can lead to overactive bladder issues. If this is true of you, then you may need to take medication to help solve this problem. You should speak to your doctor for more information.

On the other hand, if it takes you a long time to feel the need to urinate after you drink water, and you think you should be going more frequently, this can be a sign of an infection or a blockage in your urinary tract. You should also speak to your doctor about this, especially if you feel like you have to force yourself to go to the bathroom when the time does come.

It’s always a good idea to pay close attention to what your body is telling you and the ways it’s affected by your daily life. If you notice a significant change that doesn’t clear up in a day or two, talk to your doctor.